Artist Spotlight

Review: Emily Wolfe, “Roulette”

No Comments 2 November 2014

Review: Emily Wolfe, “Roulette”

“With Roulette, Emily Wolfe feels like a woman on the verge…It’s dark, haunting, and powerful stuff; the type of startlingly stirring material that makes you want to write about, and listen to, new music. Emily Wolfe is an astonishingly good singer. Listen to this before she becomes a star.”

Artist: Emily Wolfe

EP: Roulette

Genre: Dreamy Blues Rock

RIYL: Tame Impala, Metric, Spoon, Brandi Carlile

Emily Wolfe Roulette

After listening to Emily Wolfe’s new EP Roulette, I have a suspicion that those who haven’t heard of her previously will soon be pressing play to her music. Austin, Texas once again delivers a musical gift to the masses in the form of this dreamy rocker. Wolfe has a gorgeous, haunting voice that absolutely electrifies when her rough-and-ready melodies kick in. One listen, and you know you have something special in your midst.

“Ghost Limb” pushes all the right buttons from the opening strains straight into a powerful guitar riff. As soon as Wolfe’s vocals kick in, you know you’re in for an interesting ride; she’s a darkly dreamy, growly and delightfully refreshing departure. There’s an unpredictability to her songs and vocal leanings; and having that versatility is a weapon. “Swoon” is a song that has been on repeat since my first listen; it’s incredibly sexy with its fuzzy bass and incessant rhythm. Wolfe’s voice actually sounds like the audio version of “prowling,” all around the melody, infusing her gorgeous tone with a torchy, twisty quality.

“Marionette,” then, is the dreamy counterpart and absolute anchor to the middle of the EP. Wolfe’s vocals lilt and float on top of a stripped-down distorted guitar and easy percussion rhythm. It’s a special sort of magic, a beautifully broken lyrical gem - and the kind of song that digs into both her (and your) emotional depths. “Violent Veins” transitions easily back into a heavier, more melodramatic version of that vulnerability that pervades Roulette. The distorted guitar and piano break at the end is surprising, and surprisingly adds a bit of a lighter touch. “Missionary Son” brings in a blues-style stomp and finds Wolfe’s vocals again weaving in and out of the melody and bridge with an ease that belies the complexity of what’s happening underneath them.

With Roulette, Emily Wolfe feels like a woman on the verge…of a breakout, of taking no prisoners, of her own musical creativity. Both Wolfe and her backing musicians play with a joyously reckless abandon that’s only accomplished with great musicianship behind it. It’s dark, haunting, and powerful stuff; the type of startlingly stirring material that makes you want to write about, and listen to, new music. Emily Wolfe is an astonishingly good singer. Listen to this before she becomes a star.


Emily Wolfe website: http://www.emilywolfemusic.com/

 

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