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Home > Magazine > Article Archive > News

News: Reverb vs. Compression vs. Echo
Posted on Tuesday, July 05, 2011 @ 20:28:08 UTC
Topic: Recording

I was recently educated by listening to two different versions of "8 Miles High" by the Byrds. Both are on the album Fifth Dimension, Columbia Legacy CK 64847. On the RCA version (recorded in 1965) the main effect is reverb. The vocals are panned in stereo. It sounds kind of washed out. The sound is very similar to "Somebody to Love" by Jefferson Airplane, also recorded at the RCA studios. In contrast, the Columbia version - the 1966 radio version - used compression as its main effect instead of reverb. The sound is focused and intense. The ultra-compressed lead-guitar solo sounds like electric arcs zapping around. All the vocals are panned to mono in the center, adding to the focused vibe. These production methods won't apply to every rock song, of course, but they demonstrated to me the power of compression and the relative weakness of reverb in certain productions. Complete Article





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