Where Serious Musicians Surf since 1996. Serving music creators and the industry that supports them.

Main Menu
Home
Newsletter
Directory
Magazine Archive
Advertising
Follow Us On Twitter Like Us On Facebook

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsored Links

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

  
Home > Magazine > Article Archive > News

Reviews: The Yesterdays ~ Everything You Never Knew
Posted on Saturday, June 12, 2004 @ 08:25:06 UTC
Topic: Reviews

Artist: The Yesterdays

CD: Everything You Never Knew

Home: New York City

Style: Straight-Ahead Rock

Quote: "The band's energy shines though sawing guitars backed by pumping bass and strong drums."

By A.J. Van Beest

Think straight-ahead, small-band rock.

The New-York-City-based band The Yesterdays is fronted by two singer-songwriters, David Silverman and and Adam Swiderski. Silverman has a definite growl to his voice when he's ripping through the mostly love-lost lyrics of the band's first album Everything You Never Knew. Swiderski's voice is smoother, more polished, less distinctive.

As one might expect from a self-proclaimed rock band, the album is filled with guitars, drums, and angst-filled vocals.

The first track, “Cross the Line,” starts with a moody drum and bass line, shortly joined by a solo guitar ringing out a beautiful, melancholy melody. The lyrics are the oft-repeated story of a bad relationship ending badly. Perhaps the chorus of the song says it best:

Cross the line a hundred times or more
Love was pain and that's all
Nothing but space in the years we call our own
You'd rather see me fall ...


The second track, “Run For Your Life,” is more revved-up. The band's energy shines though sawing guitars backed by pumping bass and strong drums. It makes sense since the song is a call to action to live life; to go for it, whatever “it” may be.

Wake up. Can't you see you're future's a fire?
All it takes is one small spark of try.


No album is complete without a tortured love song. Enter “Hey, You Astronauts.” We've got solo guitar intro. We've got viewpoint in space so we can't see any of the grime of everyday life. We've got simulated radio voice. We've got relationship in trouble. We've got:

Hey, you satellites, I've got a signal for you.
Tell her I'm doing 80 and I'll be home soon.
Can you tell her how small our problems look from above tonight?


These first three songs are indicative of the whole album. The Yesterdays combine solid musicianship with lyrics that are “fine.” The group definitely sounds like it'd be fun in a late-night city bar. All the pieces are there for something truly unique, but the group's initial offering, Everything You Never Knew, is solid technically, but lacking that special spark to make it a beacon in the night guiding lonely hearts to safe harbors.

http://www.burntheday.com/btd/










 
Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Options

 Printer Friendly Page Printer Friendly Page

 Send this Story to a Friend Send this Story to a Friend


Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor









Home

Magazine Archive

Directory


Copyright Indie-Music.com

 

About Indie-Music.com: Where Serious Musicians Surf since 1996. Serving music creators and the industry that supports them.

Notice: This is a mandatory FTC full disclosure notice. This website reviews music from artists who may have paid for the service. We may also receive commission from sales of products advertised, featured, linked, or written about on this site. Although not typical of Indie-Music.com, this site may include paid editorials or endorsements.