Where Serious Musicians Surf since 1996. Serving music creators and the industry that supports them.

Main Menu
Home
Newsletter
Directory
Magazine Archive
Advertising
Follow Us On Twitter Like Us On Facebook

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsored Links

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

  
Home > Magazine > Article Archive > News

Reviews: Camela Widad Kraemer and the Hearts of Fire ~ Food For the Traveler
Posted on Saturday, May 06, 2006 @ 07:53:12 UTC
Topic: Reviews

Artist: Camela Widad Kraemer and the Hearts of Fire

CD: Food For the Traveler

Home: Frederick, Maryland

Style: Inspirational Folk Rock

Quote: "The inspirational lyrical content comes through on each song but not necessarily as overly religious."

By Tiffany Razzano

Camela Widad Kraemer mixes rocking folk music with soulful spirituality to bring fans more of her unique sound on her third album, Food for the Traveler. Music with spiritual tendencies often alienates listeners, but that isn't the case here. Kraemer's graceful, confident vocals, that at times sounds like a hybrid of Natalie Merchant and Fiona Apple, draw in listeners with her melodies and gutsy sound, makng them forget that they're listening to anything other than an amazing folk-rock band. The inspirational lyrical content comes through on each song but not necessarily as overly religious.

The album opens with the raucous, reggae-influenced "Beloved," where Kraemer grapples with the age old question of "why am I here?" From here she moves on to the slow-paced, gospel/soul influenced "The Flame," that kicks it up several notches on the soaring, melodic chorus. "Heart of Peace" is a ballad that opens with a gorgeous instrumental. When the vocals do come in, Kraemer implores her listeners and the world to "lay down the words, lay down the guns, lay down the fighting, let the killing be done" in a call for peace.

"Celebration" starts off as a mellow, acoustic tune before morphing into a gutsy rocker. "Song of Freedom," on the other hand, is immediately rocking and energetic, drawing in the listener from the very beginning.

"Sweet Lord," an acapella, gospel tune rich in harmonies, is the only song on the album that ever openly mentions Jesus or anything having to do with Christianity. The album ends with "The Well," a deep, dark tune that stands apart from the upbeat album. This is a must listen for fans of folk-rock.

Buy CD http://www.camelak.com










 
Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Options

 Printer Friendly Page Printer Friendly Page

 Send this Story to a Friend Send this Story to a Friend


Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor









Home

Magazine Archive

Directory


Copyright Indie-Music.com

 

About Indie-Music.com: Where Serious Musicians Surf since 1996. Serving music creators and the industry that supports them.

Notice: This is a mandatory FTC full disclosure notice. This website reviews music from artists who may have paid for the service. We may also receive commission from sales of products advertised, featured, linked, or written about on this site. Although not typical of Indie-Music.com, this site may include paid editorials or endorsements.