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Home > Magazine > Article Archive > News

Reviews: Paul Sachs ~ These Quiet Streets
Posted on Saturday, May 06, 2006 @ 08:00:58 UTC
Topic: Reviews

Artist: Paul Sachs

CD: These Quiet Streets

Home: New York City

Style: Folk

Quote: "If the Greenwich Village folk scene ever kicks back into high gear as in the 60s, we’ll all be better served if Paul Sachs joins in and shares his tales with us. This is my request that he do just that."

By Derek Blackmon

Growing up on the Lower East Side of New York will either get a man killed or make him a survivor. Paul Sachs chose to become the latter, and on These Quiet Streets, it’s evident that his upbringing left an indelible impression on his music.

“Mean Streets” introduces us to his keen observations in the same manner that Springsteen spoke of Jersey and the gloominess that surrounded him. “100 Proof” does little to dismiss the sorrow that comes with big city life. A sordid tale of homelessness, it would almost seem Sachs has been down this road himself.

The beauty of folk music is how even the most depressing themes can be somewhat lifting. Not that everything here is unhappy, but there's no suggestion that a hot bath and a razor blade would make you feel better.

“Busking” is a cool little breakdown that makes you want to run around throwing dollar bills in every open guitar case on every street corner in sight.

“The Faith of Adeline Washington” throws inspiration from a young Dylan right at your feet. If you fail to catch this one, then it’s clear you aren’t taking notice. By far the standout track, I could listen to this all day and still think “Damn, is this for real?”

“Obituaries” is a loose dream of a day without sorrow. Thought-provoking, tight and inspiring, for a moment it seems possible. Then the moment passes and reality creeps back in.

“My Father’s Old Pipe” and “Godfather of Grand Street” are short, almost whimsical songs that seem impromptu and collectively make more of this album than the other eleven tracks combined. Sometimes just throwing it down without much thought can have a greater impact than time spent dwelling over lyrics and chord structure. Sachs does himself a solid by including them here.

If the Greenwich Village folk scene ever kicks back into high gear as in the 60s, we’ll all be better served if Paul Sachs joins in and shares his tales with us. This is my request that he do just that.

Buy CD http://www.paulsachs.com












 
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