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Home > Magazine > Article Archive > News

Reviews: Breech ~ Tarnish and Undress
Posted on Saturday, August 04, 2007 @ 01:46:22 UTC
Topic: Reviews

Artist: Breech

CD: Tarnish and Undress

Home: Los Angeles, California

Style: Rock

Quote: "Chances are you’ll cry along with some of this disc; chances are you’ll recognize somebody here."

By Dan MacIntosh

Tarnish and Undress is Breech’s fifth release. And once again, Missy Gibson is the act’s center of attention. She sounds like a cross between Maria McKee and Over The Rhine’s Karin Bergquist, with a voice that is both conversational and convincing at the same time.

Gibson is also an empathetic singer, which she reveals during “Grounded." This song looks in on the life of a troubled soul. “I’m a bad girl, I’m a sinner,” Gibson says when putting herself into the femme fatale’s shoes. “I made a promise that I won’t keep,” she adds later. In fact, almost every song is about girls in various states of hard living. The rocking “Time Won’t Heal” tells of a girl who lives with pain while she looks for that rare good man. Sadly, the voices in her head do not hold out much hope. “Time won’t heal, she’s been told.”

Much of Breech’s music is quiet and moody in order for Gibson’s expressive voice to ride over the instrumentation unobstructed. But with “Keeper Of The Key," Gibson lets her inner Melissa Etheridge show through. The song’s lyric is frightening; it reads like the story of a man who holds his woman prisoner, obviously against her will. In it, she speaks about hiding from him, as the track also incorporates the sounds of a couple arguing in the background.

The next track, “Safe Here," is almost like an answer song to “Keeper of the Key." This one tells the tale of a woman that sets out on her own, despite the cold outside temperatures. But this is a hard road, as the character admits to “choking on sadness.” Its music backing is like a saloon piano ballad, with Gibson acting the perfect saloon gal. Another lovely oddball track is “Schubert Waltz," which sounds like a gypsy song out of “Threepenny Opera." Although it rolls on barroom piano and Gibson’s boisterous vocal, there is also a shimmering electric guitar solo that firmly puts it in the here and now.

Gibson may be the voice of Breech, but Mike Flanagan is the multi-instrumentalist that colors this fine vocalist’s world. He adds baritone guitar, keyboards, clarinet, banjo, accordion, and additional bass and percussion.

The CD cover pictures creepy, animated characters who are engaged in some sort of spooky fairytale. And while Gibson’s songs are made up, the circumstances she describes are deadly real. I’ll bet every woman in every woman’s shelter can find a song on this CD to relate to. Gibson, we're told, was pregnant while Breech recorded this CD. Hopefully, this means she’s a happy and fulfilled girl, with a beautiful family on the way. But the characters in these songs are completely different stories. Chances are you’ll cry along with some of this disc; chances are you’ll recognize somebody here.

Indie-Music ProfileIndie-Music Profile  

Artist Website: http://www.breech.net










 
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