Where Serious Musicians Surf since 1996. Serving music creators and the industry that supports them.

Main Menu
Home
Newsletter
Directory
Magazine Archive
Advertising
Follow Us On Twitter Like Us On Facebook

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsored Links

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

  
Home > Magazine > Article Archive > News

Reviews: Linq ~ Life Goes On
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 @ 19:03:47 UTC
Topic: Reviews

Artist: Linq

CD: Life Goes On

Home: Royalston, Massachusetts

Style: Folk/Rock

Quote: "As a protest folk singer/songwriter and activist, she somehow manages to avoid the 'Everything Sucks' sub-genre that so many indie protest folkies fall into."

By Jennifer Layton

As an indie music writer, I feel seriously outclassed here. Linq has no business being on an indie site. She should be opening for Bob Dylan. Or Joni Mitchell. Janis Ian would love her too. It’s not just Linq’s talent that puts her on this level. As a protest folk singer/songwriter and activist, she somehow manages to avoid the “Everything Sucks” sub-genre that so many indie protest folkies fall into.

“Change the Picture,” the second track on this CD, is a perfect example. Linq doesn’t just protest racism and homophobia. She tries to whip up positive change. While reminding us that “nobody’s born a racist, nobody’s born a homophobe,” she suggests that we start more conversations and set better examples for kids.

She also switches gears and uses humor to diffuse a touchy subject. Take “Diversity Dance,” a song about the disadvantages to borrowing against your 401(k). Kidding. It’s about diversity, and it features great lyrics like:

You can dance if you’re straight
You can dance if you’re gay
Transsexual too
And bisexuality is cool
It doubles the dating pool ...


See? Funny and on-target, as well as a great explanation for why my love life is so quiet. I’ve been limiting my options. Who knew?

Still, Linq provides bite when she has to, and it’s a powerful thing. The opening track, “Where Will the Wild Ones Go,” is quiet musing over the destruction of nature in order to build more shopping malls. Right away, I thought of the increase of deer in my neighborhood. The wooded areas in my part of town are being torn down to build more hotels, and suddenly deer are showing up in residential neighborhoods, attacking people in their yards. I came face to face with a doe while taking my morning walk a few months ago. I thought about that a lot during this song, which means it was only track one, and Linq was already proving how good she is.

Other standouts include “Route 32 Blues” with its great live feel. Nice to know Linq can take a break from the big social issues to notice the little things, like that thumping sound from the flat tire that’s been rolling over the past seventeen miles. “George Orwell Where Are You” is a clever, mysteriously-rapped message that will have you closing the drapes, turning off your computer, and wrapping tinfoil around your head.

My favorite is the title track. It starts with a mystical sound, like the wind over the mountains. Then, suddenly, stunningly glorious harmonies open the track. It’s a beautiful, powerful way to open the song. Picture me giving a standing ovation to vocalists June Millington, Jean Millington (they’re twins, right?), Lee Madeloni, NaiaKete, and Joy Conz. The tempo matches the ebb and flow of life, which is the point of the song.

Until the rest of the world catches on, I’ll just be grateful that Linq stopped by our little indie site. And I’ll keep this CD as proof that I knew the deal long before the majors did.

Indie-Music ProfileIndie-Music Profile  

Artist Website: http://www.linqmusic.com










 
Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Options

 Printer Friendly Page Printer Friendly Page

 Send this Story to a Friend Send this Story to a Friend


Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor

Sponsor









Home

Magazine Archive

Directory


Copyright Indie-Music.com

 

About Indie-Music.com: Where Serious Musicians Surf since 1996. Serving music creators and the industry that supports them.

Notice: This is a mandatory FTC full disclosure notice. This website reviews music from artists who may have paid for the service. We may also receive commission from sales of products advertised, featured, linked, or written about on this site. Although not typical of Indie-Music.com, this site may include paid editorials or endorsements.