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Home > Magazine > Article Archive > News

Reviews: Trish Lester ~ Plymouth Belvedere
Posted on Sunday, May 03, 2009 @ 11:19:48 UTC
Topic: Reviews

Artist: Trish Lester

CD: Plymouth Belvedere

Home: Los Angeles, California

Style: Folk

Quote: "With a voice reminiscent of Judy Collins, Lester fits in perfectly with 70s singer-songwriters like Gordon Lightfoot and John Denver."

By Jamie Anderson

With a voice reminiscent of Judy Collins, Lester fits in perfectly with 70s singer-songwriters like Gordon Lightfoot and John Denver. Offering songs about ending relationships, thanking soldiers and food (my favorite topic), she covers a lot of ground with her capable band. Iím guessing she plays the guitar since sheís pictured with one but I donít see her credited in the liner notes. She wrote most of the songs.

The title cut is about her fabulous car. She shows up at a country club, a funeral and a party, although it ruins her image. In the end she sells it for a Hummer. I donít know any folk singers who could afford the gas but then, this song is done with tongue planted firmly in cheek.

"How Do We Go On" seems a little disjointed, although the chorus brings it all together with a hope for the future. "Iím Drifting" is a sad breakup song backed by strings, and "Your Special Gift" is a sweet song about her brother.

There are lighter tunes like "Itís Just a Cookie" Ė um yeah, theyíre definitely health food - and "Waiting for An Easy Way Out." In the latter, she sings, "I canít see my toes, canít fit into my clothes, my bathroom scale and I have almost come to blows." Lots of folks can sure indentify with that.

She gets too preachy in "Thank a Soldier." I appreciate the sentiment, but itís one thatís been heard again and again. Telling a story about some particular soldiers may have been more effective.

"The Water is Wide" is pretty, with nice mandolin trills and smooth vocals.

"Smith and Wesson 38" is a story about learning to love her gun. At the end she shoots a thief and I suppose weíre supposed to cheer but it just leaves me cold. It doesnít have to be true, but itís not believable that some thug who breaks into her house is going to count the bullets as she misses him. My guess is that a couple of shots would send him screaming into the night.

At the end is "The Christmas Letter," about those dreary holiday tomes. It put a smile on my face although I was waiting for Junior to find the cure for cancer on his lunch hour. But hey, they learned to program their VCR, so itís all good.

Although the band is tight, the sound is a little dated. Her lyrics too often state the obvious, and her melodies are sometimes predictable. Her bio says sheís studied with Steve Seskin and Jon Vezner. Sheís chosen some great songwriters as teachers, so maybe her next effort will be a step forward.

Indie-Music ProfileIndie-Music Profile

Artist Website: http://www.trishlester.com










 
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